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Former Stamford Cop Charged with ... Impersonating a Cop. (Again.)

If you ever see this man representing himself as a police officer, you should know that he isn't one.

Theodore Winski, 61, of Stamford, charged with impersonating a police officer, among other charges, by New Canaan police (New Canaan Police arrest photo)
Theodore Winski, 61, of Stamford, charged with impersonating a police officer, among other charges, by New Canaan police (New Canaan Police arrest photo)
When a New Canaan police officer stopped a car June 5 because its registration had expired, through a back window he could see  shirts from a Stamford police officer's uniform on hangars, according to a police report.

New Canaan police gave this account (an accusation not proven in court) of what happened:

The officer had been on stationary radar patrol on Oenoke Ridge Road near Lukes Wood Road when a 2002 Buick Regal passed by at about 5:24 p.m. last Thursday. The car's registration had expired in May 2013.

The driver, Theodore Winski, 61, of Jefferson Street in Stamford, told the officer he was "on the job" in Stamford. Also in the back seat were uniform pants and a police clipboard with blank summons pads.

But the car was not only unregistered — Winski's driver license had been suspended indefinitely.

The officer asked to see Winski's badge. Winski said he didn't have it with him. Stamford police were called, and they said Winski was no police officer and hadn't been one for years.

This isn't the first time Winski has been charged with impersonating a police officer or arrested on other charges. According to the Connecticut Judicial Branch website, Winski was charged with impersonating police officer by Stamford police in 2003 and finally convicted on Jan. 4, 2006.

Winski's car was searched. No gun or other contraband was found.

Winski was charged with impersonating a police officer, driving an unregistered motor vehicle and driving a motor vehicle with a suspended license.

He later was released on $5,000 bond and is scheduled to appear June 19 in state Superior Court in Stamford.


13 previous convictions

According to the Connecticut Judicial Branch website, Winski was convicted of these crimes:

Impersonating a police officer — charged March 14, 2003 by Stamford police, convicted and sentenced Jan. 4, 2006, sentenced to five years of probation; convicted of violating probation on July 17, 2007, sentence revoked and probation restored on Aug. 27, 2007.

Sixth-degree larceny — charged May 31, 2003 by Stamford police, convicted on July 17, 2007, sentenced to probation on Aug. 27, 2007.

Forgery — charged May 10 2003 by Darien police, convicted Jan. 4, 2006, sentenced to probation, sentenced to violation of probation on Aug. 27, 2007.

Obtaining a controlled drug with a forged prescription — charged Feb. 2, 2005 by Greenwich police, issued an unconditional discarge, Jan. 4, 2006.

First-degree reckless endangerment — charged by Darien police on Sept. 28, 2006, convicted July 17, 2007, sentenced to a year in prison on Aug. 27, 2007.

Criminal impersonation — charged by Stamford police on April 8, 2005, pleaded guilty and issued an unconditional discharge Jan. 4, 2006.

Obtaining a controlled drug with a forged prescription — charged by Westport police on Jan. 13, 2005, sentenced on Feb. 8, 2006 to five years in jail, execution suspended after 30 days, charged with violating probation on July 30, 2007 and sentenced to six months in jail at some unspecified date.

Illegally altering a prescription — charged by Wilton police on June 15, 2006, convicted Jan. 4, 2007, sentenced to five years in jail, execution suspended after 30 days, charged with violating probation on July 30, 2007 and sentenced to six months in jail at some point.

Obtaining a controlled drug with a forged prescription on Jan. 17, 2005 — charged by Wilton police on Feb. 17, 2005

Same charge on June 10, 2005 — charged by Greenwich police that day, issued an unconditional discharge Jan. 4, 2006.

Issuing a bad check on June 10, 2005 — charged by Greenwich police that day, unconditional discharge, Jan. 4, 2006.

Same charge from Stamford police, unconditional discharge issued on Jan. 4, 2006.

Sixth-degree larceny on Nov. 13, 2005 — charged by Darien police Jan. 7, 2006, sentenced to 90 days in jail on Aug 27, 2007.

Correction: The date of Winski's conviction on charges of impersonating an officer was Jan. 4, 2006, not  July 17, 2007, when he was convicted for violating probation related to that earlier charge. An earlier version of this article, published on June 9, 2014, gave the July date for the January conviction.


Bill Payer June 10, 2014 at 01:22 PM
DM, you sound like naïve Kate Corleone.
Catherine & Dennis June 10, 2014 at 09:50 PM
@Bill Payer my first thought is they are giving breaks intentionally to an ex-cop too. After all of those charges with nothing happening to him who is the real criminal?
In The Know June 11, 2014 at 09:57 AM
To Bill Payer - When you find out just a little bit more of Winski's history you might change your mind. Just a short time into his employment, Winski was arrested and FIRED from his police job after he was caught using police computer systems to convey ownership information on various automobiles to an organized crime figure. Turns out the cars the underworld figure was interested in were the personally-owned vehicles of other law enforcement officers who had been investigating him. The unproven belief is that the individual and his entourage wanted to murder these officers. Winski was convicted but since his knowledge of what was being done with the information could not be proven (and because he was caught before anyone got hurt), he escaped extensive prison time. This conviction is from the 1980s and is so old it didn't make it into the online judicial branch computer system - but his activities since then are as represented in The Patch. Given this history I SINCERELY doubt any cops cut this guy a break. DM likely has it right: his treatment is symptomatic of an overburdened and dysfunctional court and prison system.
Catherine & Dennis June 11, 2014 at 06:48 PM
In the know I believe the inference is the judicial system that is to blame here not the police. Obviously there was an arrest the courts let him off
In The Know June 12, 2014 at 12:26 AM
Fair enough, but I doubt the courts would have any love for this individual either, given his initial offense. It's not as though he had a distinguished and heroic career and made some sort of mistake near the end - this appears to have been a very deliberate act early in his employment, almost leading one to wonder if he had bad motives for joining a police force to begin with.

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